Differential Expressions 2: Key Experiments in Developmental Biology (2-DVD set)

Mary S. Tyler and Ronald N. Kozlowski, both at the University of Maine, Orono, and Scott F....

Mary S. Tyler and Ronald N. Kozlowski, both at the University of Maine, Orono, and Scott F. Gilbert, The University of Helsinki and Swarthmore College

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Differential Expressions <sup>2</sup>: Key Experiments in Developmental Biology (2-DVD set)

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Differential Expressions2 illustrates the lives and work of eight influential scientists in the field. This 2-DVD set, an update of the original Differential Expressions published in 2003, features new interviews with Malcolm Steinberg and Elizabeth Hay. Each 10- to 20-minute segment depicts a seminal experiment in developmental biology, combining extensive illustrations and original experimental video with a...

Differential Expressions2 illustrates the lives and work of eight influential scientists in the field. This 2-DVD set, an update of the original Differential Expressions published in 2003, features new interviews with Malcolm Steinberg and Elizabeth Hay. Each 10- to 20-minute segment depicts a seminal experiment in developmental biology, combining extensive illustrations and original experimental video with a videotaped interview of the scientist who performed it. Hearing these biologists talk informally about their work, students come away with a sense of the warmth and humanity of these great names who, despite personal or historical circumstances, had the courage to see what others had not. The DVDs are augmented by a website containing additional information about each scientist, including lists of publications, still pictures, and diagrams from the videos.

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Mary S. Tyler is a Professor in the Biological Sciences Department at the University of Maine, Orono. She earned her Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1975, under the direction of W. E. Koch. From there she undertook a NATO Postdoctoral Fellowship at Dalhousie University, working with Dr. B. K. Hall, before joining the University of Maine faculty in 1976. Among several awards, she received the University's Distinguished Maine Professor Award in 1981 and the Most Inspiring Professor of the Year Award from University of Maine Student Government in 1997. In 2011, she received the Viktor Hamburger Oustanding Educator Prize from the Society for Developmental Biology. Dr. Tyler's research interests have been primarily in vertebrate embryonic development, studying organ development and tissue interactions using in vitro experimental techniques. She has examined interactions in a variety of organs in the facial region, including the palate, mandible, maxilla, and skull. More recently her interests have included the history of science, and the genetics of development, using Drosophila as a model system.

Ronald N. Kozlowski is Director of the Biology New Media Lab at the University of Maine, Orono. Working with Dr. Mary S. Tyler, he received an M.S. in Biology in 2000. He was project manager of a National Science Foundation-funded project called Environmental Engineering Process Dynamic Laboratory, directed by Dr. L. Katz, University of Texas, Austin. This resulted in the production of an educational Web site showcased by NSF at the ASEE conference in Seattle,1998, as a model site for distant education. Ron has also instructed Apple Computer employees in how the "engagement process" works between clients and developers in higher education. He is a board member of Silva Borealis, a non-profit biology-based foundation in which he also serves as the chief technical officer.

Scott F. Gilbert, a Senior Research Associate at Swarthmore College and the Finland Distinguished Professor at the University of Helsinki Institute of Biotechnology, teaches developmental biology, developmental genetics, and the history of biology. After receiving his B.A. from Wesleyan University, he pursued his graduate and postdoctoral research at The Johns Hopkins University and the University of Wisconsin. Dr. Gilbert is the recipient of several awards, including the first Viktor Hamburger Award for excellence in developmental biology education, the 2004 Alexander Kowalevsky Prize for evolutionary developmental biology, honorary degrees from the Universities of Helsinki and Tartu, and the Medal of François I from the Collège de France. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a corresponding member of the St. Petersburg Society of Naturalists, and has been chair of the Professional Development and Education Committee of the Society for Developmental Biology. His research pursues the developmental genetic mechanisms by which the turtle forms its shell.