Protein Structure and Function

Gregory A. Petsko and Dagmar Ringe both at Brandeis University
Gregory A. Petsko and Dagmar Ringe both at Brandeis University

Protein Structure and Function

Sample Content
table of contents

Description

Published by New Science Press and distributed in the U.S. and Canada by Sinauer Associates

This text introduces general principles of protein structure, folding, and function, then goes beyond these basics to tackle the conceptual basis of inferring structure and function from genomic sequence. It is the first book in a series, Primers in Biology, employing a modular design in which chapters are divided into...

Published by New Science Press and distributed in the U.S. and Canada by Sinauer Associates

This text introduces general principles of protein structure, folding, and function, then goes beyond these basics to tackle the conceptual basis of inferring structure and function from genomic sequence. It is the first book in a series, Primers in Biology, employing a modular design in which chapters are divided into topics, each occupying one two-page spread that includes the relevant text, illustrations (in full color), definitions, and references.

The book has five chapters. The first is an introduction to the principles of protein structure and folding, with emphasis on proteins' biophysical properties. The second describes the principles of the main biochemical functions of proteins, namely binding and catalysis, with a short section on the properties of structural proteins. Chapter 3 covers the regulation of protein function, containing concise descriptions of all the regulatory mechanisms that operate on proteins, from pH to phosphorylation, with several sections on protein switches based on nucleotide hydrolysis. Chapter 4 introduces the principles whereby structure and function are deduced from sequence, with illustrative examples. The final chapter addresses how data on protein structure is gathered, interpreted, and presented.

Written for upper-level undergraduates and beginning graduate students, Protein Structure and Function will also be useful for working scientists needing an up-to-date introduction to the field.

Protein Structure and Function is distributed outside the U.S. and Canada by Blackwell Publishing. Contact information is as follows:

Marston Book Services
PO Box 269
Abingdon, Oxford OX14 4YN
United Kingdom
Telephone: +44 (0) 1235 465500
Fax: +44 (0) 1235 465555
E-mail: direct.orders@marston.co.uk
Website: www.blackwellpublishing.com

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Gregory A. Petsko studied chemistry and classics as an undergraduate at Princeton University before going to Oxford as a Rhodes scholar to work for his Ph.D. with David Phillips. He then pursued his interest in the mechanism of enzyme catalysis at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he taught courses in chemistry and detective fiction. Currently the Director of the Rosenstiel Center at Brandeis, he has extended his research interests to include the use of yeast genetics to study the unfolded protein response pathway, and the mechanism of action of the ABC transporter proteins.

Dagmar Ringe graduated in chemistry from Barnard College, Columbia, and took her Ph.D. in bioorganic chemistry from Boston University. She then pursued her research interest in the study of enzyme catalysis by X-ray crystallography at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology before moving to Brandeis, where she is Professor of Biochemistry and Chemistry. The principal focus of Dr. Ringe's research is structure-function relationships in enzymes of particular industrial and pharmaceutical importance.

"This reviewer has not encountered a book better than this one for students interested in learning more about structure-function relationships in proteins."
—B. Williams, Choice

"The modular structure works well for this primer. ... The authors stress the concepts underlying protein structure, regulation, design, and mechanism. These are the fundamentals that students often miss in the rush to memorize details. ... For teachers, the organization of the book makes it easy to arrange a course or series of lectures by simply picking and choosing the topics to be covered. For students, this volume provides a well-organized introduction to protein structure and function with up-to-date references to the literature."
—Steven Smith, The Quarterly Review of Biology

On Chapter 1

"In summary this chapter covers truly a lot of ground with some insightful depth and cohesion.... In many ways it is a powerful successor to the several books on protein structure.... It has certainly moved well beyond the scope of other books, covering up to the most recent paradigm shifts in the field. The extensive use of color figures marks it as a very different kind of communication with the reader than most predecessor text."
—Robert Stroud, University of California, San Francisco

"[Protein Structure and Function] focuses on structure and stability, rather than on biological categories, and it does an excellent job of outlining the fundamental themes. It also ties in physical chemistry (through forces, etc.)."
—Stephen Harrison, Harvard University

"I read the outline and sample text (on motifs and classes of domains) with great interest. Overall I think it is just excellent—in fact it follows almost exactly the same course as my 2nd year lectures on protein structure."
—Janet Thornton, University College London (Now Director of EBI)

On Chapter 2

"A really good book provides a wealth of information in a manner that the reader remembers what he/she has read. This book does just that. The contents just pop into mind from time to time. This book will be a winner."
—Tom Bruice, University of California, Santa Barbara

"The format is very pleasing to the eye and easy to read. . . . The selection of subsections and topics is excellent."
—Karen Allen, Boston University School of Medicine

On Chapter 3

"I'm very excited about what [Petsko and Ringe] are putting together. This treatment and focus is much needed. It will be essential reading by students and faculty alike, and will serve as a crucial reference book for everyone in the biosciences."
—James Spudich, Stanford University School of Medicine

"I very much liked the Petsko–Ringe signaling section—it covered all the major bases in a thoughtful and coherent way; I'm amazed they managed to make the morass of signal transduction so intelligible."
—Tony Pawson, Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute

On Chapter 4

"It is well-written, makes for interesting reading and contains a number of excellent examples. The whole book appears to be an important, useful and timely one."
—Roman Laskowski, European Bioinformatics Institute

"I really enjoyed the content and thought the work was generally well written and very timely given the recent explosion of interest in this area."
—Michael Snyder, Yale University

Instructor Resources (Available to Qualified Adopters)

Electronic versions of the figures from the textbook to view and download

If you have adopted this text for course use (within the U.S. or Canada) and are interested in the instructor’s supplements that accompany the text, please contact   publish@sinauer.com. Outside the U.S. or Canada? Check the orders and returns page for the distributor in your region.